Topics: Out Of Lives

Kerry Gittens, a convicted murderer who fled from authorities in the midst of his, trial was captured by authorities in a motel in Katy, Texas, and escorted into the Bexar County Magistrates Office on Thursday, March 2, 2017.

Kerry Gittens, a convicted murderer who fled from authorities in the midst of his, trial was captured by authorities in a motel in Katy, Texas, and escorted into the Bexar County Magistrates Office on Thursday,

Kerry Joseph Gittens, 26, was arrested around 4:30 p.m. at a hotel in the 21000 block of Katy Freeway after a KABB-TV (FOX 29) viewer called in a tip, according to the Bexar County Sheriff's Office.

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President Trump held a rally on Tuesday night in Phoenix, whipping the crowd into a frenzy and denouncing the media between chants of “lock her up.” Trump even said the word “Antifa” for the first time in public, a reference to the anti-fascist groups that have formed to fight against neo-Nazis and Nazi sympathizers. And there was one group that got his message loud and clear: White supremacists.

Many prominent white supremacists in the US saw the rally in Charlottesville, Virginia as a major turning point, at least from a media relations point of view. A 32-year-old woman, Heather Heyer, died after a neo-Nazi terrorist drove his car into a crowd of counter protestors. And white supremacists took a more measured tone in the aftermath, making sure to denounce violence, knowing that aligning yourself with death isn’t great for the cause of creating a white ethno-state. But President Trump’s speech last night seems to have changed all that.

White supremacists like Richard Spencer appeared energized by the speech and live-tweeted their excitement as the president signaled his support in the fight against Antifa. Even before Trump said the word “Antifa,” white supremacists heard Trump’s equivocating loud and clear.

The image above is that of a woman trapped at the moment before her violent death, endlessly repeating the combination to a secret door she’ll never reach. It’s just one small sliver of the sci-fi mind-fuckery that awaits in the Rutger Hauer-voiced cyberpunk horror game Observer.

Developed by Bloober Team, the studio behind Layers of Fear , Observer is a psychological cyber-horror game set in a dark, dystopian vision of 2084 Poland. Between war and the nanophage, a deadly virus that targets the cybernetically-enhanced, humanity is pretty much broken. The survivors have submitted to the rule of a shadowy corporation that controls where and how they live.

Veteran Dutch actor Rutger Hauer plays Daniel Lazarski, a corporate-funded cybernetic Observer, a neural detective with the ability to interface with the minds of others and explore their oft-fractured psyches.

President Donald Trump on Saturday condemned violence that took place in Charlottesville , Virginia, where thousands of neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klan members, and other pieces of human trash gathered brandishing guns, torches, and Confederate flags.

But to the elation of Nazis online and armed militiamen in the streets of Charlottesville, Trump declined to distance the White House from the white hate groups who’d initially gathered in Charlottesville to protest the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. Instead, the president condemned “hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides.”

During brief remarks from his golf club in Bedminster, N.J., the president made no mention of the white supremacists, some of whom wore t-shirts featuring quotes by Adolf Hitler or carried flags bearing symbols of Nazi Germany. “It’s been going on for a long time in our country,” said Trump, apparently referencing the violence and disorder. “It’s not Donald Trump, it’s not Barack Obama.”